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The Art of Follow Through

Posted on March 6th, 2017

(by: Chloe Perez, Interior Talent, Inc.) 

For the past couple of weeks, I‘ve mentioned the significance of professional follow-up. Nothing confirms to perspective employers your interest level more than strong follow-up.  After an interview, sending a "Thank You" note is not only a nice touch but it's also super important for leaving lasting impressions and standing out from other interviewed candidates. Saying a simple, "thank you",  at the time of the interview is a basic form of gratitude and is expected. Sending an email is nice, however, an email can come across as impersonal and generic. Go the extra step and invest time and thought into a handwritten "Thank You" note. Not only does it show your potential employer thought, but it shows your initiative to keep the professional relationship open.

One of the most important things in business is connections so treat every professional contact as a future part of your professional network. You never know, even if you're not the right fit for their company, by establishing a connection early, you might be a link with other leads in the future. We strive to be a great resource for our candidates and to make the job searching process a little easier. Below is an example of how to construct a professional "Thank You" note.  Feel free to customize it to let your personality shine and best of luck on your search!

(This should be the name of the person you met with, example, "John",):

I hope this note finds you well.  I wanted to thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to discuss my potential future with (name of company).  It was great to meet you and the team.  (If possible, insert something about the meeting; a shared connection or interest that surfaced.)

I hope to have the opportunity to continue the dialogue and remain under consideration for this role at (company name) .

Thank you,

- Name

(contact info)

 
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